Architectural monuments (10)
Most of the monuments of Miercurea Ciuc date from the 19th and 20th century, built in a neoclassic, eclectic or even art nouveau style, as follows: The old bourgeois houses of Petőfi street, the most important public institutions such as: The Court of Justice, the Town Hall, the long-ago National Bank’s building, the “Márton Áron” Gymnasium. But there are a few even earlier buildings of which the most remarkable one is the Mikó Castle possessing great architecture history. Unfortunately a lot of ancient buildings got sacrificed during the dictatorship of Ceausescu, but the town still has an emphatic centerline – Cetății/Kastély Square – Petőfi street, Márton Áron street –, that still gives back the ancient picture and spirit of Miercurea Ciuc.

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Court of Justice

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Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Department of the County Emergency Hospital

Barangolás indítása

Gál and Csiszér Houses

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General Accounting Office

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Roman Catholic Gymnasium

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The Chapel of Márton Áron Highschool

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The former Roman Catholic Grammar School from Șumuleu Ciuc

Tour stages
Mikó Castle

The Mikó Castle is a fortified castle that became generally known as “The Castle” (A Vár). It is the oldest building of Miercurea Ciuc. It was built on the initiative of Ferenc Hídvégi Mikó, vice–captain of the Szeklers from Ciuc, in order to stop the invasion of the Turkish troops. Ferenc Mikó was advisor of the Transylvanian prince, Gábor Bethlen. Mikó was member of the lower nobility but thanks to his loyalty to the prince, he became member of the high nobility. He was one of the most experienced diplomats of Gábor Bethlen and one of the most remarkable personalities of the 17th century political life. In 1613 Mikó was named as captain of the Szeklers from Ciuc, but the local residents were not enthusiastic about his nomination. Their disapproval against Mikó was based on his lack of a local residence, on his lack of animals and estates in the region. It seems however that the real reason of their disapproval was the Unitarian religion and the “foreign” origin of Mikó (he was not born in the region of Ciuc).
Mikó started to have the castle built on the 26th of April 1623. At this time (1615 - 1634) the Italian Giacomo Resti was working as court builder in Transylvania, and it is very probable that he also took part in the construction of the neo-renaissance castle. The quadrangular castle has a basic area of 75 x 70 meters. The work was finished in the 1630s. The style of the castle is similar to the fortified castles from Iernut, Vinţu de Jos and Lăzarea.
The first written record that proves the existence of the castle dates back to 1631. After the premature death of the heir of Ferenc Mikó, the castle belonged for several years to Tamás Damokos, the chief mayor of Ciuc. On the 21st of October 1661 the Turkish and Tartar troops of Ali, pasha of Timişoara, invaded and burnt the castle up. The restoration of the building took place only years after the ravage, in the period of 1714 – 1716, as directed by the Austrian general, Stephan Steinville.
In 1735 four bastions were built around the castle, the ruins of which can still be seen at the Southern part of the building. To the south-western part of the castle they built a little store for gun powder, and the southern bastion was transformed into a chapel. The Austrians reinforced the castle by inserting above the entablatures several tall, narrow and square – shaped loop-holes. The castle became this way part of the Eastern defensive line of the Habsburg Empire.
Until the middle of the 20th century the building was constantly used by different military forces as barracks, from 1961 it functioned as state mechanical premises.
It was only in 1970 when the Szekler Museum of Ciuc (Csíki Székely Múzeum), founded in 1930, moved into the castle and has been functioning there ever since.

Court of Justice

The impressive eclectical style establishment was constructed in 1905 based on the project of architect Wagner Gyula, who is also the initiator of the detention house next to the Court of Justice. He is considered one of the outstanding architects from the beginning of the last century specialized on courts of justice and detention houses. During his carrier he realized almost 200 public establishments.
In 1872, after the public administration was separated from the legal jurisdiction, the court of justice moved from Şumuleu Ciuc to the Town Hall of Miercurea Ciuc, then is 1887 into the building of residence of the generals of the 1st Szekler Infantry Regiment (today the Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Hospital). At the beginning of August 1905 the institution moved to its final destination after the establishment of today’s Court of Justice was built based on the project of the Hungarian architect from Budapest. On the façade the following was written „M. KIR. TÖRVÉNYHÁZ” [Hungarian King’s Court House].
Several institutions, companies functioned in the building, but after the fall of the communist leadership it belongs to the Court of Justice. The last restoration of the building took place in the period between 1995-2005.

Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Department of the County Emergency Hospital

The one-storey classicist building, referred as „Lábas” house was built in 1786.
From the end of the 18th century and at the beginning of the 19th century it served as residence of the generals of the 1st Szekler Infantry Regiment (General Kommando). Later, after the settling of Ciuc county it was used by the Court of Justice separated from the central administration.
The building itself received various functions during the last century: between 1904-1921 it functioned as furniture factory, boarding school, private house, and for a short period from 1942 as obstetrics hospital managed by dr. Nagy András, initiated and financed by the Csíki Private Funds. At present the newly restored establishment hosts the Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Department of the County Emergency Hospital.

Gál and Csiszér Houses

One cannot miss the two villa-type buildings situated on the Castle Square next to the former Court of Justice (today’s Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Department of the County Emergency Hospital) and Town Hall. Both one-storey establishments with monumental importance were built in 1911 and they are completely identical.

Town Hall

The unique oval shaped, one-storey building with backside dated from 1886-1887 functioned as the administrative center of Ciuc for long periods during the town’s history. After 1878 Miercurea Ciuc became the administrative center of Ciuc county, consequently the construction project for a new county hall was initiaded and it was managed by count Mikó Mihály. 
The original establishment later was improved on the North and South with simmetrical pentaaxal facades, and 9 more axes towards the present Str. Petőfi and a perpendicular16-axal wing on the main façade.
Until the 1980’s the building functioned as County Hall, gaining its final shape between 1913-1914. Since then it hosts the Town Hall, while the Northern wing functions as the county’s military center.
The main facade was restored in 2000, when the town’s armour was placed in the oval hole at the center of the facade, and the county armours were restaurated from the corners of the frontispiece.

General Accounting Office

The former residence of the National Bank was built at the beginning of the 20th century being finshed by 1940. Between 1940-1944 it functioned as Hungarian National Bank, and between 1945-1948 as Romanian National Bank. Before 1990 it was the residence of the Romanian State Bank, and until 2000 it functioned again as National Bank. In 2000’s various financial institutions functioned in it. Presently it is the residence of General Accounting Office. The curiosity about the building happened due to the socialist town planning project, when the building’s location turned out to be inadequate. The original site was on the place of today’s Sindicates Cultural House.
Consequently the 2400 tons building was moved 127 m away by a running gear. This process took 1 month.

Roman Catholic Gymnasium

The present establishment of the Roman Catholic Gymnasium of Miercurea Ciuc hosting the Márton Áron and Segítő Mária Gymnasiums is the descendant of the late ancient grammar school run by the monks of the Franciscan begging order moved from Şumuleu Ciuc in 1911.
Though the desire for a spacious and modern building was born in 1896, the construction started only in 1909 after long treaties led by count Majláth Gusztáv Károly. The project itself was realized by architect Alpár Ignácz. The monumental secessionist building was finished by 5th June 1911 with the exception of the South wing which was ready in 1913. Count Majláth Gusztáv Károly Bishop of Transylvania celebrated the inauguration ceremony of the institution.
The Southern one from the two symmetrical wings hosted the grammar school, the Northern one hosted the boarding school. In the central part of the building there was established a chapel.
During the thorough restoration project of the establishment the in vitro windows of the chapel were completely replaced a few years ago thanks to the meticulous work of the two artists Nagy Ödön and Vorzsák Gyula on the basis of late students’ memoirs, by creating modern and monumental colorful work. The complete restoration project of the town’s most impressive establisment took place between 2010-2011 lead by local architect Máthé Zoltán.

The Chapel of Márton Áron Highschool

The festivity hall of Márton Áron Highschool is situated on the first floor of the Gymnasium’s building opposite the main stair case. Recently the hall has regained its original function thus being retransformed into a chapel. The enormous vitrail windows were realized based on old reminiscences and on the recollections of former teachers and students of the school. The two local artists Ödön Nagy and Gyula Vorzsák created completely new vitrails evolving a modernist colorful impression. Each window illustrate separate scenes and the one in the middle depicting Virgin Mary holding his Son connects all the three windows with its trails of light. The window on the right illustraits King Saint Stephen in the moment of offering his crown to the Holy Mother, while the one on the left shows Prince Saint Emeric holding a white lily in his hand.
The original designation of the chapel is visible through the Neo-Roman decorations such as the arch, balustrade of the gallery, the midget-sized pillars, the heads of the pillars, the carved chambers in the walls. In the middle of the chancel arch the Hungarian armour is visible.

Pretorium

The individual one-storey public building opposite the Marian Churgh of Şumuleu Ciuc was built between 1828-1841 as the administrative head office of Ciuc, Gheorgheni and Caşin counties, which was mandatory from the end of the 18th century. Though the centralized command was Mártonfalva for the location of head office, the result of a long dispute on 21st May 1810 the representatives voted for Şumuleu Ciuc. The construction was started only in 1828 and lasted more than 10 years. This institution managed the county’s activity until 1876, when it was moved to Miercurea Ciuc.
The building has received various functions during the years. For a period it was run as the seminar of the Roman Catholic Gymnasium, then as boarding school, school, obstetrics, weaving mill and private flats.
It has been functioning as Infectious Diseases Hospital since 1949, however in the near future a new function shift can be expected as the building was returned under the Roman Catholic Church administration.
A curiosity of the building besides its L-shape turned later into U-shape, is the similarity to the Franciscan monastery.

The former Roman Catholic Grammar School from Șumuleu Ciuc

The predecessor of the present Roman Catholic Gymnasium is the establishment from Șumuleu Ciuc built in the middle of the 17th century and run by the Franciscan monks from Șumuleu.
The popular education was highly influenced by the Franciscan monastery set on Șumuleu. They established an elementary school even in the early 16th century, developed later into grammar school in the 17th century.
Written documents from the 1630’s mention the existence of the school. The compelling one-storey construction was financed by the surrounding villages and was realized between 1780-1782, receiving additional premises with time. Beginning with1858 the pedagogical institution functioned in this establishment.
By the end of the19th century the desire for a spacious and modern building was born. The primary initiator of the new construction project was Kuncz Elek educational inspector from Cluj Napoca, father of the outstanding Transylvanian poet and writer, Kuncz Aladár. After long disputes and preparations the gymnasium moved to its present location in 1911. Beginning from 1913 the Ciuc County Orphanage functioned in the building financed by the Csíki Private Funds until 2003. Today it belongs to the Csíki Private Funds and functions as Szent István College run by Dévai Szent Ferenc Fund, managed by ofm. Böjthe Csaba.